Brexit & Academia: Challenges for UK scholars in Germany

KNOWLEDGE KNOWS NO BOUNDARIES

British citizens resident in European Union countries will be seriously affected by Brexit. Those working in research – whether at universities, public or private research institutes – are particularly vulnerable given the high degree of professional mobility that is widely viewed as essential for a successful career. Reputations in academia are increasingly dependent on international visibility and collaboration of the individual scholar.

The European Union has, over recent decades, created a huge variety of instruments to promote careers in research and teaching for its citizens that cover all stages, from the early career student to the acclaimed professor. These range from ERASMUS grants for student exchanges to EU research framework programmes (currently Horizon 2020) and the prestigious European Research Council grants. British academics, working in the UK and in other EU countries, have been highly successful in acquiring this European funding in the past. Many, indeed, have built their careers around EU-funded programmes and the collaborative research projects they have enabled. It is essential to them and to future generations of British academics that this principal gateway to an international career is not closed or restricted. As the future relationship between the UK and EU27 is negotiated over the coming months, securing these benefits of research collaboration for the post-Brexit era will be critical for British academics and the UK research community in general.

Beyond specific research and training opportunities, British academics are part of a mobile community who greatly benefit from free movement within the EU. It is essential, therefore, that the UK and EU reach an understanding that maintains the rights that UK citizens in the EU currently enjoy to avoid professional and family disruptions. Although some progress has been made on citizens’ rights, as is documented in the Joint Report of 8 December 2017, there are still several serious concerns that remain unresolved. Moreover, the December 2017 joint understanding will only become valid as part of an overall agreement on Brexit.

British in Europe (BiE) is a coalition of organisations throughout the EU who are campaigning in Brussels and London on behalf of British citizens. In Germany, British in Germany (BiG) is active on behalf of British citizens, both in lobbying at local and national levels and in forming local groups disseminating information on the state of negotiations and on issues such as German citizenship applications. BiG has commented on negotiating rounds relating to citizens’ rights [link] and compiled a detailed response to the Joint Report of December [link]. It has become clear that the implications of Brexit for individuals in terms of freedom of movement and cross-border working depend very much on the time of residence and on employment and family status. A selection of case studies illustrating the complexity of these issues is available here.

British in Germany is interested in reaching as many British citizens as possible to be able to inform you of progress on the issues surrounding citizens’ rights. If you are interested in receiving information on British in Germany activities and on local meetings, please contact with us here. We are interested in hearing your stories, concerns and views so that our approach can evolve appropriately as the negotiations continue. Your information will be passed on to the most relevant British in Germany group representing your interests.

In particular, if you are a British citizen working in a university or other research organisation in Germany, we would very much welcome your opinion on the concerns you have and the assistance you would appreciate relating specifically to the research profession.

We hope to hear from you!

https://BritishinGermany.org

https://BritishinEurope.org

 

 

 

 

 

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