Category Archives: British in Europe

Posts relating to British in Europe

British in Europe writes to the UK and EU Negotiating Teams

You have probably already seen the 2nd Open Letter that British in Europe has written to Dominic Raab in the UK and Michel Barnier in the EU regarding the fate of EU and UK citizens in a “no-deal” Brexit scenario.

If you haven’t, please take time to take a look now.

Maybe you could bring it to the attention of your UK MP or your MEP in Brussels. We are also planning to start a grassroots letter writing campaign to MdBs asap so please keep an eye out for that.

We only ask that the UK and EU agree to ring-fence the agreement that they have already come to regarding EU and UK citizens regardless of the outcome in the Brexit negotiations and end the uncertainty we are facing.

Launch of Free Movement campaign

British in Germany has teamed up with British in Europe to produce a video campaign highlighting the positive cases of free movement and calling for this to be put back on the table in negotiations.
We have had two professional videos made and want YOU to help this make some noise by making your own videos, watch the instructional video for more information on how to do this.
Please share anywhere and everywhere and encourage your friends/family/colleagues to make their own videos. We are looking forward to seeing your submissions.

Please view the current videos at our YouTube Channel by clicking on our banner to the above.

FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT

is a fundamental right of all EU citizens. It means you can live, work, travel and study in any EU country.

Under the current draft UK/EU Withdrawal Agreement all UK citizens living in the EU will LOSE their right to Free Movement.

BUT IT’S NOT OVER YET!

There are 1.2 million British citizens living in the European Union. All of them plus their families, friends and colleagues would be affected if free movement were lost. We want Theresa May to put continuing free movement for UK citizens in the EU back on the negotiating table.

And YOU can really help!

WE CAN REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Watch the instructional video to see HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED, and please like, subscribe and share this with everyone you know who could be affected.

#KeepFOM

How to send us a video

Remember to only use your first name in the videos! Title your video #KeepFOM – (your name)’s Story, blur or pixelate any faces of people not involved in the campaign and fill in the permission form before or after you send your video (if you do not do this we will not be able to use your submission!)

Via dropbox:

  1. Set up a free dropbox account online and upload your video to your account.
  2. Share your video with bievideocampaign@gmail.com (our dropbox account, not our email, for contact info see below!)
  3. Fill out the permission form here so we can use your video!

Via skype:

  1. Log into skype
  2. Find the contact British InEurope
  3. Choose the option to leave us a video message and send!
  4. Fill out the permission form here so we can use your video!

Want to send us a message?

Contact us at KeepFoM@britishineurope.org

What will happen with my video?

The video will be checked by members of the British in Europe team who will edit and cut the video depending on its length and relevance of content. Once agreed that the video is ok for upload on the YouTube channel and complies with social media policy, the BiE #KeepFOM hash tag label will be inserted in the bottom corner of the video as a stamp of approval, as on the first two professional films.

If we find that the video is being posted to other platforms without the permission or approval of the British in Europe Video Campaign team, copyright infringement will be brought to light and we will ask for immediate removal of the video.

Should you wish for your video to be removed from our platforms at a later date, we will comply and remove your video.

Social media policy

All videos will be first checked that they comply with the FoM campaign requirements and that they follow the generic guidelines put out by many social media campaigns preventing for example: Hate speech, Profanity, obscenity or vulgarity, nudity of any kind, defamation to a person or people, name calling and/or personal attacks, comments whose main purpose are to sell a product, comments that infringe on copyrights, spam comments such as the same comment posted repeatedly on a profile, any other comments that the BiE FoM Social Media team deem inappropriate.

Meeting with the Exiting the European Union Committee in London

Today, 6th June, Nicholas Hatton, Co-chair, the3million, Anne Laure Donskoy, Co-chair, the3million, and Barbara Drozdowicz, Chief Executive Officer, East European Resource Centre; Fiona Godfrey, Chair, British Immigrants living in Luxembourg (BRILL), and Deputy Chair of British in Europe, Jane Golding, Co-Chair, British in Germany, and Chair of British in Europe, Michael Harris, Chair, EuroCitizens, Spain, and Kalba Meadows, Founder, Remain in France Together (RIFT), France all met with and provided evidence to the Exiting the European Union Committee in London.

The meeting was divided into two sessions, one covering the situation of EU Citizens in the UK and the second covering that of UK Citizens in the EU.

The event was recorded and is available on Parliament Live TV, with the second session starting at 10:29:00.

British in Europe on flagship BBC radio programme

Fiona Godfrey, one of the deputy chairs of British in Europe and chair of British Immigrants Living in Luxembourg, spoke today with Reality Check Correspondent Chris Morris on the BBC Radio 4’s flagship morning news programme “Today”.

Fiona explains how the current situation for working Brits in the EU remains extremely unclear. While it is expected that those currently living in an EU Member State will retain their right to work in the Member State of their residence, those who work cross-border, either physically or virtually, will lose that right unless something new is negotiated.

While Fiona is a Luxembourg resident and in such a small country almost inevitably has to work cross-border, Helen lives in the much larger country of France, and yet still needs to seek cross-border work, in this case during the off-season at her ski chalet.

Both are currently seeking dual nationality in their respective countries, an option which is open to Brits in Germany who have the necessary years of residency here, but is only guaranteed until the Brexit date–29 March 2019–after which they may fall foul of Germany’s Single Nationality rule.

Their interview can be best heard on the BBC’s Full Facts website.

Or here on the Today Programme at 44:38 minutes in.

For those who choose to give up their UK citizenship in order to gain a German one post Brexit, the UK government has once more shown how it is wants to help, by hiking the fees.

However, not only Brits already in Europe are going to face difficulties. There are also Brits in the UK who also need to travel to Europe to work, if not necessary live. The BBC Today programme yesterday featured an orchestra in the UK who are now concerned about their ability to easily travel to the EU to perform. The report can be found at 1:43:00 in on this broadcast.

And finally in what was a busy week for UK Citizens in the EU on Radio 4, this final report discusses the position of UK citizens in Spain (and by extension in Germany) with regard to their Registration (Anmeldung in Germany) and continuing Freedom of Movement, etc. The report can be found at 42:00 in on this broadcast.

To show how difficult Citizen’s Rights are, Europe Street News has helpfully produced the following summary chart.

Freedom of Movement survey results

In May 2018, British in Europe carried out a survey on the importance of  Freedom of Movement (FoM) to its supporters. Over 3,000 people responded, and the results have now been published. 

It is clear that a significant proportion of UK citizens in Europe rely on FoM in their daily lives, while others have future plans dependent on FoM.  FoM is also consistently seen as important when considering the opportunities available to children.

You can read the results below, or download the pdf here. You can also subscribe to the British in Europe newsletter here.

 

Brexit & Academia: Challenges for UK scholars in Germany

KNOWLEDGE KNOWS NO BOUNDARIES

British citizens resident in European Union countries will be seriously affected by Brexit. Those working in research – whether at universities, public or private research institutes – are particularly vulnerable given the high degree of professional mobility that is widely viewed as essential for a successful career. Reputations in academia are increasingly dependent on international visibility and collaboration of the individual scholar.

The European Union has, over recent decades, created a huge variety of instruments to promote careers in research and teaching for its citizens that cover all stages, from the early career student to the acclaimed professor. These range from ERASMUS grants for student exchanges to EU research framework programmes (currently Horizon 2020) and the prestigious European Research Council grants. British academics, working in the UK and in other EU countries, have been highly successful in acquiring this European funding in the past. Many, indeed, have built their careers around EU-funded programmes and the collaborative research projects they have enabled. It is essential to them and to future generations of British academics that this principal gateway to an international career is not closed or restricted. As the future relationship between the UK and EU27 is negotiated over the coming months, securing these benefits of research collaboration for the post-Brexit era will be critical for British academics and the UK research community in general.

Beyond specific research and training opportunities, British academics are part of a mobile community who greatly benefit from free movement within the EU. It is essential, therefore, that the UK and EU reach an understanding that maintains the rights that UK citizens in the EU currently enjoy to avoid professional and family disruptions. Although some progress has been made on citizens’ rights, as is documented in the Joint Report of 8 December 2017, there are still several serious concerns that remain unresolved. Moreover, the December 2017 joint understanding will only become valid as part of an overall agreement on Brexit.

British in Europe (BiE) is a coalition of organisations throughout the EU who are campaigning in Brussels and London on behalf of British citizens. In Germany, British in Germany (BiG) is active on behalf of British citizens, both in lobbying at local and national levels and in forming local groups disseminating information on the state of negotiations and on issues such as German citizenship applications. BiG has commented on negotiating rounds relating to citizens’ rights [link] and compiled a detailed response to the Joint Report of December [link]. It has become clear that the implications of Brexit for individuals in terms of freedom of movement and cross-border working depend very much on the time of residence and on employment and family status. A selection of case studies illustrating the complexity of these issues is available here.

British in Germany is interested in reaching as many British citizens as possible to be able to inform you of progress on the issues surrounding citizens’ rights. If you are interested in receiving information on British in Germany activities and on local meetings, please contact with us here. We are interested in hearing your stories, concerns and views so that our approach can evolve appropriately as the negotiations continue. Your information will be passed on to the most relevant British in Germany group representing your interests.

In particular, if you are a British citizen working in a university or other research organisation in Germany, we would very much welcome your opinion on the concerns you have and the assistance you would appreciate relating specifically to the research profession.

We hope to hear from you!

https://BritishinGermany.org

https://BritishinEurope.org

 

 

 

 

 

British in Europe survey – registering your residence

This survey, for British in Europe and its member groups, is designed to help us find out more about our members’ experiences of registering residence as a British citizen when first arriving to live in Germany, and also applying for a permanent residence card after 5 years. We’re carrying out similar surveys amongst our members across the EU.

Why are we asking you these questions? The EU 27 countries will shortly be considering how to ‘register’ UK citizens living in the EU after 31 December 2020: to continue the current declaratory system, or to introduce a new constitutive system where we would be required to apply for a new status, in keeping with the UK’s wish to oblige EU27 citizens to apply for ‘settled status’ rather than simply confirm their existing rights. We’d like to know your views and experiences to help our input into the process.

If members of your household or friends have also registered here in Germany, please pass on this link and ask them to complete the survey too

The survey is open until Wednesday, 9 May. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfx29oyTus42VSKTyFyYVUsMY864IgTG1Hwro8L57lvjTXSVA/viewform