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Stammtisch Events

Here are the current Stammtisch Events around Germany that we are aware of.

Berlin

Time: Saturday 13 April, 13:30 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Past Events

Berlin

Time: 19:30-21:00 – Brexit discussion (speakers tbc)
21:00 until very late – Music and dancing

Place: Freudenzimmer
Mehringdamm 61, 10961 Berlin

Price:  €4 online, €5 on the door
all profits go to British in Germany, e.V.

Details: jonworth.eu/fuxit2/

Stuttgart

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Grand Café Planie
Charlottenplatz 17, 70173 Stuttgart

Nuremberg

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:30 – 23:00 (approx)
Place: O’Shea’s Irish Pub & Biergarten
Am Wespennest 6, 90403, Nuremberg

Munich

Time: Friday 29 March, 18:30 – 23:00 (approx)
Place: Paulaner im Tal
Tal 12, 80331 Munich

Hamburg

Time: Friday 29 March ,19:00 – 23:00 (approx)
Place:Simian Ales
65A, Langelohe, 25337 Elmshorn
Resister at Eventbrite

Frankfurt

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:30 – 22:30 (approx)
Place: Fox and Hound,
Niedenau 2, 60325, Frankfurt

Berlin

Time: Saturday 16 March, 13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Hanover

Time: Friday 15 March ,17:30- 19:45 (approx)
Place: Meiers Lebenslust
Osterstraße 64, 30159 Hanover, Germany

Köln

Time: Thursday  14 March ,17:30- 19:00 (approx)
Place:Tasty Pasty Company
Mauenheimer Str. 28, 50733 Köln

Münster

Time: Friday  8 March ,19:00- 21:00 (approx)
Place: Spook’s
Hammer Str. 66, 48153 Münster

Berlin

Time: Saturday 2 March, 13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Bremen

Time: Saturday  2 March ,17:30- 20:30 (approx)
Place: Loft Bremen
Bahnhofsplatz 5 – 7, 28195 Bremen

Hanover

Time: Monday 28 February ,18:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Duke Irish Pub, 
Raschplatz 6, 30161 Hanover

Frankfurt

Time: Monday 25 February ,19:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, 
Große Rittergasse 49, 60594 Frankfurt

Hamburg

Time: Thursday 21 February ,19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Alles Elbe
Hein-Hoyer-Straße 63, 20359 Sankt Pauli

Berlin

Time: Saturday 16 February ,13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Berlin

Time: Saturday 2 February ,13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog, Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Stuttgart

Time: Thursday  31 January ,19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Academie der schönen Künste, Charlottenstraße 5, 70182 Stuttgart

Bremen

Time: Thursday  31 January ,19:00 – 23:30 (approx)
Place:Loft Bremen, Bahnhofsplatz 5 – 7, 28195 Bremen

Frankfurt

Time: Wednesday 30 January ,19:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, 
Große Rittergasse 49, 60594 Frankfurt

Also see our Events Calendar.

Registering in Berlin and elsewhere

Update 4 April, 2019

Important news from British in Bavaria about the official letter regarding residence for BRITS IN MUNICH – if this applies to you, please read carefully. Further, please note that Brits living in Munich who haven’t yet registered with the Kreisverwaltungsreferat (that’s the Meldeamt in Munich) as a resident, need to get their skates on. And do kindly pass this info on to anyone who it might help.

So here it is:
The Foreigners´ Office (Ausländerbehörde) in Munich is today (Wednesday, 3 April) sending out letters (with English translation) to all UK nationals registered as resident in the City of Munich, setting out what´s next. So, look out for these letters in your postbox in the next day or so.

Note: All the Ausländerbehörden around the country are finding it difficult to plan at the moment, given the ongoing uncertainty over Brexit deadlines. Munich´s solution is to nominate 15 April as the start date for online booking of appointments to go along and discuss your application for a residence title. If the UK leaves on 12 April, online booking opens on 15 April (not before). If it´s still not clear by then, the start of online booking will also be delayed.
Please also take a look at the website of the Munich Ausländerbehörde.

So: patience is required, on all sides. If you haven´t heard yet from your Ausländerbehörde, this is not necessarily a cause for concern. But of course if you are not registered as a resident (angemeldet) with your local authority (Meldeamt), then you need to do this asap, to ensure you will be notified about arrangements for applying for a residence permit.

Update 1 April, 2019

The UK Government has provided a list of all the Foreigners Authorities in Germany which they know about and if they are requesting Registration as in Berlin. Please check this list for updates as we will not be able to highlight changes other than for the biggest places.

Leipzig is missing from the list but has also announced a pre-registration form in a message to British Nationals.  (Please note that the submission stages of the form might not work on all browsers. Should you encounter difficulties, try using Firefox.)

Update 22 March, 2019

Following the European Council the UK’s departure from the EU has been put back until at least 12 April, 2019. The Berlin Ausländerbehörde have updated their website, but are unable to provide additional details until 29 March, 2019. However, we are concerned to learn that of approx. 18,000 UK Citizens registered in Berlin (Angemeldet) only 8,600 have so far registered themselves on the Berlin Website for a future Residence Permit. Please ensure you do as soon as possible and check with all UK acquaintances that they have too.

Original Article:

Whether there is a withdrawal deal or not, British citizens will require a residency title or other proof of their right of residency in Germany following Brexit.

If there is no deal, as it stands, all British citizens in Germany would have to apply for a residency title by 30 June 2019.

If there is a deal (i.e. the withdrawal agreement between the UK and the EU is ratified), British citizens would still be required to prove their right to residency.

Until the UK leaves the EU, British citizens continue to have the right of freedom of movement. However, some local immigration authorities are introducing a voluntary registration process so that they can contact affected citizens more easily, whatever happens.

For example, the Berlin immigration authority is already inviting UK nationals resident in Berlin to pre-register for a residency permit application. While it is technically voluntary, it is strongly recommended that you register before 29 March 2019 if you are resident in Berlin. The confirmation of registration ensures the residency rights acquired in Germany will remain valid from Brexit until a decision is taken on the subsequent application.

BiG have liaised with the Berlin immigration office and requested clarification on a number of points, including questions from BiG members. These have been addressed through an extensive FAQ page in English and German. Please also read the explanatory notes on the registration page carefully.

If you live outside Berlin please check the website of your local immigration authority for more information on the planned process where you live.

Both Berliners and those living elsewhere might also like to refer to the Federal Ministry of the Interior’s FAQs on right of residence in the context of Brexit in English and German.

InfoAbend in Cologne, 13 February

Safeguarding the rights of British nationals living and working in the EU remains a top priority for both the UK and the EU, and the British community in Germany are an important part of the future UK-Germany relationship. We are continuing our series of information evenings across Germany to ensure British citizens have the opportunity to share any concerns, and ask our speakers any questions they have about citizens’ rights post-Brexit.

Time: 13 February, 18:00 – 20:00

Place: St. George’s – The British International School Cologne, Husarenstraße 20, 50997 Köln

The event is primarily aimed at British citizens living in and around Cologne. Family members and friends are of course also welcome to attend.

Limited spaces available. Doors open at 17:30. Please give your name when reserving your ticket as ID will be requested on the door.

Please click on this link to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/open-evening-for-british-nationals-in-cologne-tickets-55751497229

We look forward to seeing you!

Also see our Events Calendar.

ger1axg [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], from Wikimedia Commons

InfoAbend in Stuttgart, 31 January

Join us for a talk from Stuttgart-based commercial lawyer John Hammond (CMS) on the legal perspective on the current Brexit situation, followed by a Q&A.

John Hammond specialises in international M&A transactions and joint ventures. He advises major German and international companies on cross-border deals as well as on dispute resolution. He has long-standing experience advising on international projects, in particular in the UK, Russia and CEE countries.

Location: academie der schönsten künste, 70182 Stuttgart-Mitte
Date and time: Thursday, 31 January 2019. 19:00-22:00

British in Germany believes that all those who moved to the EU prior to the UK exiting the EU should not be negatively and retrospectively affected by the exit of the UK from the EU. UK citizens travelled over many decades to live and work across Europe, with the expectation that our citizens rights were for life and were irrevocable. Stuttgart is the sixth largest city in Germany with a significant and highly integrated population of British nationals. As a chapter of British in Germany, British in Stuttgart aims to provide a network of information and support for British nationals and their families during the negotiations in Europe and in the period thereafter. British in Germany is a coalition member of British in Europe, the largest citizens’ rights organisation in Europe. They are in direct consultation with both sides of the Brexit negotiating
table. By working together, we will not be ignored.

Click on the logo beneath to download a copy of the flyer for the event.

Also see our Events Calendar.

Image: By Julian Herzog, CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43511715

Report on InfoAbend in Hamburg, 22 January

Since this report was first published an interview with several attendees has appeared on German TV and can be seen with english subtitles on YouTube:

And Deutsche Welle also produced a report on the effect of Brexit on British Nationals in Hamburg.

The original report follows:

On the evening of  22 January 2019, the British Embassy, along with the British Honorary Consul for Hamburg, Nicholas Teller, hosted an information evening for British citizens in Hamburg. The event was held at the Anglican Church of St Thomas Becket, thanks to Revd Canon Dr Leslie Nathaniel and was very well attended with 220 people filling all available seats.

On the panel were Nicholas Teller, Rachel King and Prisca Merz from the British Embassy in Berlin, Ellie Sellwood representative from British in Germany, Beate Wolk from the Einwohner Zentralamt Hamburg and Christiane Lex-Asuagbor, Head of the Rechtsabteilung.

The event kicked off with a welcoming speech from Revd Canon Dr Leslie Nathaniel and Nicholas Teller. Then there were individual speeches on the topic of Brexit and what Brits can do to prepare from Rachel King, Ellie Sellwood and Christiane Lex-Asuagbor.

Rachel King outlined the British government’s hopes for Brexit, and outlined the Withdrawal agreement, which would give British Citizens in Germany a transition period within which to get everything in order. During the transition period, from 29 March 2019 until 31 December 2020, British Citizens can be expected to be treated as EU nationals, with the same rights to live and work in Germany and move freely around Europe. Of course, she stressed that the government does not want or expect a no-deal situation. But in this case, Ms King assured all British Citizens present that there are plans in place to mitigate the effects of this, i.e. the 3-month transition period offered by German authorities which will allow British residents to apply for permanent residence or a passport and stay in the country whilst a decision is made.

Ellie Sellwood introduced the campaign group British in Germany and stressed that British Citizens across Germany have been living in limbo since June 2016. She also outlined the deal and no-deal scenarios and what both will mean for British Citizens in Hamburg and ended by outlining British in Germany’s ‘No-Deal Checklist.’

Christiane Lex-Asuagbor stressed that there wasn’t much that she could add given the complexity of the situation, but stated that after the UK’s departure from the EU, British Citizens will need a residence permit of some kind to be able to continue living and working here in Germany. She outlined the different types of residence permit and the requirements for each.

The evening then concluded with a 90 minute Q&A session led by Nicholas Teller in which concerned British Citizens could direct their questions to the representatives from the British Embassy and Hamburg authorities.

Main image: By IqRS – Fotos von IqRS, freigegeben als PD (siehe  [[:de:Wikipedia:Bilderwerkstatt/Archiv/2008/Juli#Alster|]]), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15650549

Article images (c) Chris Nicolls, Hamburg English Pages

Report on InfoAbend in Dresden, 11th January


An information event organised by the British embassy and the Deutsch-Britische Gesellschaft was held in Dresden on the evening of 11 January 2019. It was attended by approximately 70 persons. The vast majority of those present had arrived in Germany within the last 5 years and were working. None had taken on German citizenship and only three people were applying for German citizenship.


Deputy Head of Mission Robbie Bulloch gave an update on citizens’ rights in both a deal and no-deal situations. He stressed that the government does not want or expect a no-deal situation. Rob Compton then gave a short speech introducing British in Germany, its current activities and called for audience members to get involved with British in Germany in Dresden.

Daniel Senf of the Deutsch-Britische Gesellschaft Dresden chaired a 90-minute Q&A session in which the audience asked many questions concerning their rights after the UK exits the EU. Almost all questions were related to residence entitlements and third country national status and/or retaining British nationality when taking German citizenship in both deal / no-deal scenarios. Prisca Merz of the British embassy was able to provide lots of detail.

Main Image: By User:Kolossos – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2092763

In-page Images: British in Germany

British in Germany on ZDF’s Länderspiegel

ZDF’s regional magazine programme Länderspiegel contained an item on the concerns and fate of British Citizens living in Germany.

With interviews from Paderborn and Berlin, British Citizens were asked about their concerns and fears from a British Brexit.

The programme can be seen (in German naturally), by clicking on the image below and going to the second item in the programme at 4:41mins in.

Images (c) ZDF, 2019

And here are a few more photographs taken at the Stammtisch by Rob.

Images (c) Rob Compton, 2019

Stammtisch in Frankfurt, 30th January

Come along to the next British in Germany Frankfurt Stammtisch taking place on Wednesday the 30th of January! It is a chance for British Citizens in the area to gather and discuss the events of this week, and any Brexit developments that happen between now and then.

Time: 19:00 – 21:00
Place: Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, Große Rittergasse 49, 60594 Frankfurt

More information and a contact person can be found on the Facebook posting.

Also see our Events Calendar.

Jane Golding speaks for BiG before a Bundestag Committee

The German Parliamentary Committee for the European Union has heard from Expert Witnesses about the Withdrawal Agreement between the EU and the UK. Jane Golding attended to provide evidence on the impact of Brexit on UK nationals living and working in Germany.

Although she chose to speak in English, the recording of the event contains only the German translation.

Her contributions can be seen at 32:30 (following the question from the German MP) and for a second time at 1:10:40 on the Bundestag Mediathek Website with a report (in German) of the proceeding also on the Bundestag Website.

British in Germany also provided written evidence what can also be found on the Bundestag Website as part of the entire written contributions.