Category Archives: EU Level

Freedom of Movement survey

British in Europe is carrying out a survey of its coalition members and individual supporters to gauge support for a last big push on free movement.  We know that there is a good deal of support for this in British in Germany, but want to get feedback from all our members. Please take a minute to help by filling out the survey and distributing the link:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfJHO9On5eIqmm8dR5kILcWRw4jsu35WTECg7a3BzvlbGz-pg/viewform  

Update: This survey is now closed. Thank-you to those that participated.

Where does the March Agreement leave me?

On Monday 18 March, the European Commission published its third draft legal text for the Withdrawal Agreement and announced that it and the UK had reached “complete agreement” on citizens’ rights. You’re probably wondering whether that is in fact the case, and where the March agreement leaves you. This is a quick (and non-exhaustive) general summary of the state of play. It’s a mixture of good news, bad news and unfinished business, the balance of which is different for each of us, depending on the particular situation that we are in. We are still hoping that the unfinished business, such as whether we have … Continue Reading ››

Who are the Brits in Germany?

In 2016  the German Statistical Office recorded around  107,000 registered Brits living in Germany. Since June 2016, that figure has risen sharply.

North Rhein-Westphalia had the greatest number of registered Brits (26,205), followed by Bavaria (18,400) then Berlin with 12,355. 

Highly-qualified 

A 2016 micro-census  by the German Statistical Office revealed that 74% of British migrants in Germany have a professional qualification. This makes them some of the most sought-after workers in Germany: only Austrian migrants had … Continue Reading ››

BiE response to agreed legal text 14 March

Brexit withdrawal agreement:  English Cheddar will have more free movement rights than Brits in Europe

  The European Commission has published the agreed legal text for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. In response, Jane Golding, Chair of British in Europe said: ‘Contrary to what David Davis and Michel Barnier are saying, this document provides no more certainty for the 1.2mn British people living in the EU 27, EEA and Switzerland than they had this morning. Not only does the text look as though it has been rushed out under pressure but in his statement, Mr Barnier once again said that … Continue Reading ››

Uk in EU status goes to ECJ!

Congratulations Brexpats Hear our Voice! Breaking News: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/07/british-group-wins-right-to-take-brexit-case-to-european-court   BRUSSELS/BERLIN/LUXEMBOURG A court in Amsterdam has decided to refer questions to the Court of Justice of the EU in the case of 5 British nationals in the Netherlands after they brought a landmark legal case which had argued that their existing EU citizenship rights could not be removed following the UK referendum to leave the EU. The judge ruled on Wednesday that questions should be referred. Reacting to the ruling Jane Golding, Chair of British in Europe said: 'We are delighted that the Dutch court has decided to refer this case to Luxembourg. The applicants … Continue Reading ››

Where has Dec agreement left us?

This is a quick (and non-exhaustive) general summary of the state of play from British in Europe after the phase 1 agreement on citizens’ rights. It’s a mixture of good news, bad news and unfinished business, the balance of which is different for each of us, depending on the particular situation that we are in. The unfinished business, such as whether we have free movement across the EU 27, will be discussed in the second phase. Our concern is that this could get lost in the mass of issues now to be discussed such as airline slots. And until the … Continue Reading ››

Latest Brexit Negotiation Review

There is a serious risk of a political stitch-up in December, where progress falling well short of protecting our rights is certified by the EU to be “sufficient”, just so that the sides can move on to discussing trade.  If that happens and Citizens Rights are discussed in parallel with trade and other matters, we will be bargaining chips in the full sense of that term.  So it is vital to avoid that, and for the same reasons any agreement which is made now must be ring-fenced to prevent it being revisited as part of the trade negotiations. Why is there no deal yet? Each side has said that Brexit should … Continue Reading ››