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Upcoming Stammtisch Events

Here are the next British in Germany Stammtisch events that we are aware of, plus a list of past events for those interested in being in touch with established Stammtisch groups around the country:

Next:

Hanover

Time: Thursday 12 September, 19:00 – 22:00

Place: Meiers Lebenslust (Osterstraße 64, Hanover)

Details: Facebook event

Berlin

Time: Saturday 14 September, 13:00 – 17:00

Place: BrewDog Mitte (Ackerstraße 29, Berlin)

Details: Facebook event

Past Events

Berlin

Time: Saturday 11 May, 13:30 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Time: Saturday 13 April, 13:30 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Time: 19:30-21:00 – Brexit discussion (speakers tbc)
21:00 until very late – Music and dancing

Place: Freudenzimmer
Mehringdamm 61, 10961 Berlin

Price:  €4 online, €5 on the door
all profits go to British in Germany, e.V.

Details: jonworth.eu/fuxit2/

Stammtisch March Time: Saturday 16 March, 13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Bremen

Time: Tuesday 28 May, 19:30 – 23:00

Place: Loft Bremen, Bahnhofsplatz 5 – 7, 28195 Bremen

Details: Facebook event

Stuttgart

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Grand Café Planie
Charlottenplatz 17, 70173 Stuttgart

Nuremberg

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:30 – 23:00 (approx)
Place: O’Shea’s Irish Pub & Biergarten
Am Wespennest 6, 90403, Nuremberg

Munich

Time: Friday 29 March, 18:30 – 23:00 (approx)
Place: Paulaner im Tal
Tal 12, 80331 Munich

Hamburg

Time: Friday 29 March ,19:00 – 23:00 (approx)
Place:Simian Ales
65A, Langelohe, 25337 Elmshorn
Resister at Eventbrite

Frankfurt

Time: Friday 29 March, 19:30 – 22:30 (approx)
Place: Fox and Hound,
Niedenau 2, 60325, Frankfurt

Hanover

Time: Friday 15 March ,17:30- 19:45 (approx)
Place: Meiers Lebenslust
Osterstraße 64, 30159 Hanover, Germany

Time: Friday 17 May, 19:00 – 23:00

Place: Ständige Vertretung (Friedrichswall 10, Hanover)

Köln

Time: Thursday  14 March ,17:30- 19:00 (approx)
Place:Tasty Pasty Company
Mauenheimer Str. 28, 50733 Köln

Münster

Time: Friday  8 March ,19:00- 21:00 (approx)
Place: Spook’s
Hammer Str. 66, 48153 Münster

Berlin

Time: Saturday 2 March, 13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Bremen

Time: Saturday  2 March ,17:30- 20:30 (approx)
Place: Loft Bremen
Bahnhofsplatz 5 – 7, 28195 Bremen

Hanover

Time: Monday 28 February ,18:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Duke Irish Pub, 
Raschplatz 6, 30161 Hanover

Frankfurt

Time: Monday 25 February ,19:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, 
Große Rittergasse 49, 60594 Frankfurt

Hamburg

Time: Thursday 21 February ,19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Alles Elbe
Hein-Hoyer-Straße 63, 20359 Sankt Pauli

Berlin

Time: Saturday 16 February ,13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog
Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Berlin

Time: Saturday 2 February ,13:00 – 17:00 (approx)
Place: Brewdog, Ackerstraße 29, 10115, Berlin

Stuttgart

Time: Thursday  31 January ,19:00 – 22:00 (approx)
Place: Academie der schönen Künste, Charlottenstraße 5, 70182 Stuttgart

Bremen

Time: Thursday  31 January ,19:00 – 23:30 (approx)
Place:Loft Bremen, Bahnhofsplatz 5 – 7, 28195 Bremen

Frankfurt

Time: Wednesday 30 January ,19:00 – 21:00 (approx)
Place: Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, 
Große Rittergasse 49, 60594 Frankfurt

Also see our Events Calendar.

#stopthecoup Berlin Saturday 7 September 2019

Sara Gordon reports on pro democracy demonstration which took place in Berlin last weekend.

On Saturday representatives from British in Germany joined grassroots organisation Stop the Coup Berlin, also supported by Pulse of Europe, to defend British democracy in the face of the current government’s attempts to push through a no-deal Brexit.

Many Brits living in Germany along with the vast majority of EU citizens living in the UK were not able to vote in the referendum, a decision that will detrimentally affect our lives and futures. The threat of a no-deal Brexit has caused fear, anger and distress, compounded by stressful cliff-edge situations and the threats to democracy in the UK government under Boris Johnson. Many in British in Germany face uncertainty until they are granted some form of residence permit, and many will not be able to apply until Brexit happens. Brits elsewhere in the EU may be even less fortunate. A disorderly Brexit could make them illegal overnight – resulting in traumatic chaos.

Aware of the potential consequences of a disorderly Brexit both here in Germany and back in the UK, Brits and EU citizens banded together to form Stop the Coup Berlin. Following on from smaller protest on 31 August, a core of seven people went to work, lost lots of sleep, and organised a larger demonstration on Pariser Platz directly in front of the Brandenburg Gate on Saturday 7th September. 

Speakers included MEP Sergey Lagodlnsky (Bündnis 90/die Grünen), who spoke about the importance of democracy; Berlin-based British political commentator Jon Worth, who shared his analysis of recent events; Daniel Tetlow of British in Germany, who spoke about citizen rights, academic Prof. Dr. Mareike Kleine (LSE / Freie Universität), who spoke about what happens when democracies go bad; newlywed British-born German Rachel Marriott who detailed some of the experiences of Brits living in Germany in the face of Brexit. This was followed by a brief open-mic session, followed by Scottish stand-up comedian Neil Numb who added his lighter-hearted take on all this. 

The whole event was accompanied by local musicians Espin and the Noisses, the highlight of which was perhaps the duet set of EU-inspired songs by Noisses’ singer Lucy Stubley and Espin, including “Nothing compares to EU”.

The protest was a resounding success! At peak, we counted 150 attendees and collected over 220 signatures for the letter to Ambassador Sir Sebastian Wood, which was delivered to a representative on the day by coordinator Rose Newell and logistics man Maurice Bennet. 

Depending on events over the next few weeks, British in Germany will continue to coordinate with Stop the Coup Berlin and Pulse of Europe on the best way to proceed. It is highly likely that another demonstration will be organised in the near future. 

We would like to thank all that attended the demonstration and encourage more to come out next time! 

Until then, we encourage you to visit the British in Germany Berlin Stammtisch this Saturday (14th September) at BrewDog Mitte (1 to 5 pm) and keep in touch via Facebook, Twitter and email. 

Images (c) Sara Gordon, 2019

The event was cover by several media outlets. Here are a few links to their reporting:

Reuters: Demonstrators protest against no-deal Brexit in central Berlin

Berlin Spectator: British Expatriates Stage Protest Against Brexit

For more about Stop the Coup see their website.

Sara was also interviewed by the Guardian recently in their article ‘A beautiful dream destroyed’: Britons in EU on no-deal Brexit

Upcoming information events

The British Embassy is organising information events in order to ensure that Brits living in Germany are kept in the loop with information regarding the UK’s preparations to leave the EU. These events will be an opportunity for UK nationals to pose questions regarding individual situations and a British in Germany e.V. representative  has also been invited to speak at each event.

DATES AND LOCATIONS

  • Berlin, 30 September
  • Düsseldorf, 1 October
  • Frankfurt, 10 October
  • Hamburg, 15 October
  • Munich, 24 October

Please bear in mind that interested participants will have to register in advance. Details to follow.

Also see the Embassy’s webpage.

British Embassy hold their first Facebook Live Event

Report by Elise Shepley (BIG Intern)

The British Embassy in Berlin led an hour-long Facebook live Q&A on August 6th 2019, in an attempt to directly address the questions and concerns of British citizens living in Germany in the run up to Brexit.

Over 200 questions were answered, and the Embassy has subsequently produced a summary of the event, which documents all of the questions and answers posed during the Q&A session. All questions posed within the hour-long time frame received a response from the Embassy over the following 24 hours.

The Embassy’s document has been organised into eight categories determined by the questions posed:

  • Residency (103 questions)
  • Work, qualifications, pensions, and benefits (36 questions)
  • Travel (15 questions)
  • Healthcare (24 questions)
  • Passport and nationality (18 questions)
  • Miscellaneous (16 questions)
  • Returning to the UK (5 questions)
  • Education (1 question)

Residency was therefore by far the most recurrent theme, with particular concerns about registration for residency permits being raised. The Embassy reiterates that anyone previously exercising free movement rights in Germany may be granted a residency permit, with permanent permits only being granted automatically to those who have been in Germany five years or longer.  The Embassy also confirms that the residency permit is not tied to any German language requirements, nor to employment status.

Other recurring themes included questions about the future status of health insurance policies for UK citizens in Germany (S1), queries about dual citizenship and the position of family members of different nationalities, and about potential issues in travelling into Germany and returning to the UK.

The FB live event created on the whole very positive feedback from BiG members and the Embassy committed a significant amount of manpower and resources to the event.    We hope this will set the precedent for further FB live events in Germany and across Europe as British citizens living in the EU face increasing uncertainty and anxiety about their lives and livelihoods living in Europe.

You can also access the full Embassy document with all of the questions and responses.

BiG Chair Jane Golding on BBC Today Programme

 

British in Germany’s chair and co-chair of British in Europe Jane Golding was interviewed by Nick Robinson on BBC Radio 4’s flagship news programme TODAY on 2nd September 2019.

Jane Golding, Chair of British in Germany e.V.

You can listen to the interview here by spooling 2 hours and 33 minutes through the programme. (8.33am BST)

Nick Robinson, BBC Today Programme Presenter

 

 

Urgent MEP Pledge 2019

British in Germany urges everyone to use their right to vote in the European Parliament elections on 23-26 May. Together with British in Europe and the3million, we encourage you to contact MEP candidates in your region (whether in the UK or other EU country) and ask them to sign the pledge to keep citizens’ rights on the agenda and guarantee our rights fully in the next European Parliament. If you are meeting any candidates at hustings or other European election events, please ask them to sign the pledge!

If you have decided to vote in the UK:

Click here to write to your existing UK MEP https://www.writetothem.com

Click here to see the list of candidates in your region (UK) https://whocanivotefor.co.uk

The pledge:

As a candidate for the European Parliament elections 2019:

  1. I support a commitment before the October deadline to safeguard citizens’ rights at EU/UK level, whatever the outcome of Brexit.
  2. I support a strong stance by the European Parliament on the protection of citizens’ rights in any negotiations on a future EU/UK relationship.
  3. I support freedom of movement, and will conduct an honest debate to explain the opportunities it has given people across Europe and ensure this right is protected in the next European Parliament.

Ask your MEP candidate to tweet a photo of themselves with a printout of the pledge below to @the3million, @britishineurope and @britishingermany

#thecitizenspledge #BritishinEuropeVote #BritishinGermanyvote

Further information:

The pledge is aimed mostly at British MEP candidates but can be endorsed by MEP candidates from other EU27 countries to support protecting the rights of EU citizens in the UK and British citizens in the EU27.

For further detail on how to secure rights by the October deadline, see https://bit.ly/t3m_BiE_April2019.

British in Germany does not endorse individual candidates or any political parties.

Note to candidates:

Please take a picture of yourself with the pledge on a tablet or on paper and tweet it.   Here is the pledge which can be enlarged and is also available on the 3 million.org.uk website and here on our BiG page:

We suggest you use the wording below:  As an MEP I will protect the rights of @the3million EU citizens in UK and 1.2 million @BritishinEurope #citizenspledge #the3millionvote

If you want to check out who has signed so far, you can visit the Signatories page.

Report: British Embassy Event, Berlin, 30 April 2019

On the 30th of April, the British Embassy in Berlin hosted two info events for British citizens living in Germany. Rachel King from the British Embassy introduced the event and discussed the current situation. She was followed by Herr Engelhard Mazanke, head of the Ausländerbehörde (Foreigners Registration Office in Berlin, LABO) in Berlin. To round up the speeches, Prisca Merz, the Embassy’s regional policy advisor, spoke about what the Embassy in Berlin is doing to keep UK citizens informed during these febrile uncertain times. The key points of the speeches in the order they were delivered are as follows:

From Rachel King: first, the current Brexit extension is to last until 31st October 2019. If a deal is ratified by both the UK Parliament and the EU before that date, the UK will leave on the first day of the following month. The withdrawal agreement protects the rights of residents in their current country of residence and allows for a transition period until 31.12.2020, this is the preferred course of the EU and the British government. The government of the UK does not accept a no deal scenario. Please see the policy paper on citizens’ rights in a no-deal scenario on the UK government website (www.uk.gov/world/living-in-germany). The policy paper discusses rights to work, study, receive benefits/ services, and pensions in Germany in all scenarios. It also gives dates and guidelines for families who are moving back to the UK, and explains how their family members can join them within the time limit.

The UK has decided to guarantee EU citizens in UK the ability to bring a partner, spouse, or dependent to the UK until 29 March 2022. It is unclear what the requirements would be after this date. In terms of higher education, EU nationals are eligible for home fees for 7 years after exit day if they have started their studies before exit.

If the UK leaves without a deal, UK nationals will not need visas for short stays elsewhere in the EU. You will be able to stay up to 90 days in another EU country, within a 180 day period. The request from the UK government is that the EU countries will respond in kind.

During the event, Germany government officials repeated many times that no UK citizen in Germany will be asked to leave due to Brexit.

The extension also means that UK citizens can take part in the EU elections. They should register before 7 May for UK and before 5 May for Germany.

As a result of the uncertainty surrounding exit day, the German government has passed a law regarding social security contributions. This law also allows for UK citizens to join German health insurance:

Steps recommended to take now:

1. Register with German authorities (Anmeldungsbescheinigung)

2. Contact your local LABO for new documentation–for example, Berlin provides online registration. If you have not already registered, please do so. This is to help ensure you can continue to live and work Germany regardless of the uncertainty of not knowing when exit day will happen.

3. Change your UK driver’s license to a German one. You will be allowed to drive in the UK on a German license, but it is unclear at this time if you will be able to drive in Germany with a UK licence.

4. If you have qualifications that have not yet been recognised in Germany, you should do so now. This is not required for academic qualifications, such as a B.A.

5. Ensure that your passport is valid for a minimum of 6months after 31.10.2019.

Information is constantly updated on the embassy website and you can follow them on social media, sign up for emails, and check the website frequently for updates.

After Ms. King’s speech, Herr Mazanke, Head of the Foreigners Registration Office in Berlin started his speech with apologies. At this time he is unable to give any concrete details about what is in store for Brits in Germany after exit. With the lack of clarity in outcomes, he does not have all the information yet.

The process is still open and ongoing. He stated clearly that his advice is for Berliners only and that he cannot speak for other Bundesländer and is not informed as to how each of them is handling Brexit and the registration process.

He encourages all who are not from Berlin to make themselves known to their individual Ausländerbehörde and follow the instructions given.

What has changed in Berlin since the last information meeting? 10,000 of 18,000 (registered as living in Berlin at the local Rathäuser) Brits in Berlin have signed up with the LABO. 4,000 UK citizens in Berlin have been invited to appointments. Those invited so far have shown a long-term commitment in Germany and have been resident for over 5 years. 400 have already had their appointments and each have received a Niederlassungserlaubnis, a form of permanent residency in Germany.

There have been three main responses from UK citizens in Berlin that Herr Mazanke’s office have received:

1. Why have I been invited? You are all still EU citizens and no one is required to attend these appointments. If you choose not to come, please inform your case worker, so that they can offer the appointment to someone else. For every five people invited, four have shown up.

2. Fear. With responses such as: “my file isn’t complete,” “I do not have a valid passport,” or “will I be deported?,” etc. Herr Mazanke reiterated that no Berliners will be deported. You are here on your right to free movement as an EU citizen. Please come to the appointments.

3. Relief. People have expressed gratitude for the smooth process. Come what may,their residency in Germany is resolved. Please take the appointments seriously. There is no fee for permanent residency. UK families living in Berlin are being invited as a unit. If a person has not lived in Germany for five years they will receive a two year permit. This can be renewed until five years’ residence is reached. This is being done so that families can continue to live and travel together within the Schengen zone.

The current set of appointments given out by LABO has filled up all slots available to Brits until the end of June. All those who have yet to receive an invitation should check back on our website, as there will be a step-by-step process depending on happens in the UK from 1 July, dependent on whether the UK takes part in the EU elections – which is now certain.

The goal of the LABO is that all UK citizens in Berlin are given the chance to go through the registration process and that everyone has a residency title appointment before 31.12.2019. Of course this is dependent on how the Brexit situation develops. Herr Mazanke reiterated: please register online and follow our FAQs on the LABO website. Finally, Herr Mazanke thanked all Brits in Germany for their patience and understanding in this uncertain time.

At the end, Frau Prisca Merz, Regional Consular Policy Advisor at the British Embassy, then introduced the different tables at the information fair. These tables included information about health insurance, pensions, DAAD (education and access to universities), the German Federal Employment Agency, Citizenship and our British in Germany Verein . She concluded by repeating that anyone registered with the Ausländerbehörde and awaiting an appointment can continue to work and live in Berlin until they receive a decision on residency. It was suggested that the final acknowledgement screen is printed out and kept as evidence of having completed the online registration.

At the British in Germany table Jane, Jenny, Rachel and I spoke with many people about their concerns and about what British in Germany as an organisation does. We received many thanks for the hard work being done behind the scenes in Germany, and by our umbrella organisation British in Europe. Most who came to the table signed up for our emails and others offered to volunteer. We look forward to seeing many of those at the next Stammtisch on 11 May.

Sara Gordon
BiG Volunteer and Stammtisch leader.
______


NOTE: The next BiG Stammtisch in Berlin will take place on 11 May at BrewDog (Berlin-Mitte) from 1pm-5pm. BrewDog is a British bar with craft beers and cider on draft. This week we will be discussing the current Brexit situation, new information from the Ausländerbehörde Berlin, and your questions. Please note that the Stammtisch will now be monthly, so don’t miss this chance to meet up with other Brits and have a pint. We look forward to seeing you there!

Statement from the British Embassy in Berlin

The British Embassy posted the following statement on Facebook on Friday 5 April. Please find a copy of the statement below:

From the British Embassy today:

Dear all,

The British Embassy Berlin would like to draw your attention to these key sources of information for UK nationals living in Germany. We are grateful for your help in sharing this information with any UK nationals in your organisations and networks.

There are several steps which you can take to help prepare for the UK’s Exit from the EU. We recommend you take these practical steps as soon as possible. More information is available on the Living in Germany Guide, the UK government’s main source of information for UK nationals in Germany, which is regularly updated. You can sign up for email alerts.

Registration: You must ensure that you are correctly registered with your local residents’ registration office (Einwohnermeldeamt) before the UK leaves the EU.

Residency: In addition, in all EU Exit scenarios, UK nationals living in Germany will need to apply for a new residence permit from their local Foreigners’ Authority (Ausländerbehörde). Please read the Federal Interior Ministry’s FAQs (in German, English translation to be published soon).

If the Withdrawal Agreement is ratified, this can be done until at least the end of 2020.
In a no deal scenario, the German government is planning a transition period of initially three months, which they intend to extend by a further six, during which you can apply for a residence permit.

This application should be done irrespective of whether you have in the past been issued with an ‘unbefristete Aufenthaltserlaubnis’ or another residence permit.

Some Foreigners’ Authorities are already planning a voluntary registration/application procedure before the UK leaves the EU. Please see our guidance on Foreigners’ Authorities and complete your local process as soon as possible.

Passports and Travel: The rules for passport and travel to most countries in Europe will change if the UK leaves the EU with no deal. You should have at least 6 months left on your passport from your date of arrival to any Schengen country, including Germany. This applies to adult and child passports. You can use this tool to check if your passport is valid before booking travel. In addition, in the case of a no deal scenario, if you need to leave and re-enter Germany before you have received your new residence permit, please plan more time at the border and take relevant documents, such as your registration certificate, social security confirmations, or work or rental contracts, with you.

Healthcare: If you are working in Germany and paying German social security contributions, your healthcare via a German health insurance provider (Krankenkasse) will not be affected by the UK’s exit from the EU. If your healthcare is currently covered via a S1 form and the UK leaves the EU without a deal, your access to healthcare may change. In this case, you should take out German health insurance. According to German no-deal legislation, you will be able to join a statutory health insurance (gesetzliche Krankenversicherung) within three months of the UK leaving the EU, without being subject to the normal restrictions on age etc. You would be required to pay towards this insurance. For more information please read the Association of German Health Insurers’ Brexit FAQ.

In addition, your European Healthcare Insurance Card (EHIC) might no longer be valid, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. Visitors should therefore ensure they have comprehensive travel insurance before travelling. Students should make sure they have appropriate health insurance.

Driving: Holders of UK driving licences who are resident in Germany should exchange their UK licence for a German driving licence before the UK leaves the EU. Your local Bürgeramt will be able to advise on where you must go to do this. You will be allowed to drive on your German licence when visiting the UK. An International Driving Permit is not a suitable alternative to exchanging your licence. Visitors to Germany will be allowed to drive on their UK photocard driving licence. Paper licences will not be valid. For more information please read the Federal Ministry of Transport’s questions and answers about EU Exit (in German)

Professional Qualifications: If you hold UK professional qualifications you may need to get them recognised in Germany before exit day. Find out where you can request recognition of your qualifications in Germany (in German) and read the European Commission’s guidance on recognition of professional qualifications during EU Exit. For further information, please consult Anerkennung in Deutschland’s Brexit FAQs.
Civil servants: If you are employed as a civil servant (Beamte/r), you will need a permit to continue your employment after the UK has left the EU. Further information can be found here (in German). Please consult your employer.
We appreciate that this is a period of uncertainty and many of you want more information and advice. We want to help you prepare for all scenarios and are committed to ensuring relevant information is available in a transparent and accessible way.

To stay up to date, please sign up for email alerts on our Living in Germany Guide and follow Brits in Germany on Facebook. Members of your organisation might also be interested in attending one of our information events across Germany.

Please also share the attached leaflet with your British members.

Many thanks,

British Embassy

Amy McHugh • EU & Economic Support Officer • British Embassy • Wilhelmstrasse 70 • 10117 Berlin

Image: By Jean-Pierre Dalbéra from Paris, France – L’Ambassade du Royaume-Uni (Berlin), CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6791741

Registering in Berlin and elsewhere

Update 4 April, 2019

Important news from British in Bavaria about the official letter regarding residence for BRITS IN MUNICH – if this applies to you, please read carefully. Further, please note that Brits living in Munich who haven’t yet registered with the Kreisverwaltungsreferat (that’s the Meldeamt in Munich) as a resident, need to get their skates on. And do kindly pass this info on to anyone who it might help.

So here it is:
The Foreigners´ Office (Ausländerbehörde) in Munich is today (Wednesday, 3 April) sending out letters (with English translation) to all UK nationals registered as resident in the City of Munich, setting out what´s next. So, look out for these letters in your postbox in the next day or so.

Note: All the Ausländerbehörden around the country are finding it difficult to plan at the moment, given the ongoing uncertainty over Brexit deadlines. Munich´s solution is to nominate 15 April as the start date for online booking of appointments to go along and discuss your application for a residence title. If the UK leaves on 12 April, online booking opens on 15 April (not before). If it´s still not clear by then, the start of online booking will also be delayed.
Please also take a look at the website of the Munich Ausländerbehörde.

So: patience is required, on all sides. If you haven´t heard yet from your Ausländerbehörde, this is not necessarily a cause for concern. But of course if you are not registered as a resident (angemeldet) with your local authority (Meldeamt), then you need to do this asap, to ensure you will be notified about arrangements for applying for a residence permit.

Update 1 April, 2019

The UK Government has provided a list of all the Foreigners Authorities in Germany which they know about and if they are requesting Registration as in Berlin. Please check this list for updates as we will not be able to highlight changes other than for the biggest places.

Leipzig is missing from the list but has also announced a pre-registration form in a message to British Nationals.  (Please note that the submission stages of the form might not work on all browsers. Should you encounter difficulties, try using Firefox.)

Update 22 March, 2019

Following the European Council the UK’s departure from the EU has been put back until at least 12 April, 2019. The Berlin Ausländerbehörde have updated their website, but are unable to provide additional details until 29 March, 2019. However, we are concerned to learn that of approx. 18,000 UK Citizens registered in Berlin (Angemeldet) only 8,600 have so far registered themselves on the Berlin Website for a future Residence Permit. Please ensure you do as soon as possible and check with all UK acquaintances that they have too.

Original Article:

Whether there is a withdrawal deal or not, British citizens will require a residency title or other proof of their right of residency in Germany following Brexit.

If there is no deal, as it stands, all British citizens in Germany would have to apply for a residency title by 30 June 2019.

If there is a deal (i.e. the withdrawal agreement between the UK and the EU is ratified), British citizens would still be required to prove their right to residency.

Until the UK leaves the EU, British citizens continue to have the right of freedom of movement. However, some local immigration authorities are introducing a voluntary registration process so that they can contact affected citizens more easily, whatever happens.

For example, the Berlin immigration authority is already inviting UK nationals resident in Berlin to pre-register for a residency permit application. While it is technically voluntary, it is strongly recommended that you register before 29 March 2019 if you are resident in Berlin. The confirmation of registration ensures the residency rights acquired in Germany will remain valid from Brexit until a decision is taken on the subsequent application.

BiG have liaised with the Berlin immigration office and requested clarification on a number of points, including questions from BiG members. These have been addressed through an extensive FAQ page in English and German. Please also read the explanatory notes on the registration page carefully.

If you live outside Berlin please check the website of your local immigration authority for more information on the planned process where you live.

Both Berliners and those living elsewhere might also like to refer to the Federal Ministry of the Interior’s FAQs on right of residence in the context of Brexit in English and German.